Animal shelters in Butte County sees increase in animals

Animal shelters in Butte County sees increase in animals

Animal shelters in Butte County have seen an increase in animals over the past couple of months.

According to the animal services manager for Chico, Tracy Mohr, animal shelters typically do see an increase in animals after New Year’s Eve for several reasons that include fireworks and gunshots.

“We have a very high return to owner rate,” Mohr said. “It runs anywhere between 60 to 75% of our strays actually go home.”

  • Gregory the great Dane stretches his legs Monday, Jan. 3, 2021 at the Chico Animal Shelter in Chico, California. (Rebekah Ludman/Enterprise-Record)

  • Gregory the great Dane waits behind a fence Monday, Jan. 3, 2021 at the Chico Animal Shelter in Chico, California. (Rebekah Ludman/Enterprise-Record)

  • Layla the cat climbs at Chico Animal Shelter on Monday, Jan. 3, 2021 in Chico, California. (Rebekah Ludman/Enterprise-Record)

  • A couple of dogs look toward people Monday, Jan. 3, 2021 at the Chico Animal Shelter in Chico, California. (Rebekah Ludman/Enterprise-Record)

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She said that the Chico Animal Shelter is full right now, but it is not at its max capacity. Although the Chico Animal Shelter is currently seeing an increase in dog intakes, Mohr said that there has actually been a small decline in dog intakes over the last 10 years.

The animal shelter is also seeing higher numbers of animals due to many pet owners moving right now. Mohr said that right now the animal shelter does see an increase of people wanting to surrender their pets. This is due to multiple reasons including people moving and people decided that having a dog was not a great decision for them.

In addition to seeing an increase in taking in pets, Mohr said that the animal shelter has seen an increase in pet adoptions.

“It’s a good time to get a pet because people time to get the animal acclimated to their home environment,” Mohr said. “They have some time to spend with them before they have to go back to work after the holidays.”

Butte County Humane Society Adoptions Manager Shannon Wright said it has also seen a little bit of an increase in animals being taken in. She said that it’s for a number of reasons including many people moving.

“It’s a little bit increased; we are definitely fuller than we were back in mid 2020,” Wright said.

She said that in the beginning of the year, there were a lot of people seeking pet companionship. Then, towards the end of the year animals started coming into the shelter system more frequently.

“We’re here to serve the community and to really find these pets the right home, not just any home,” Wright said. “We want to find the one that’s right for them. And make sure that it’s a good fit, and that it sticks.”

The Northwest SPCA in Oroville has seen an increase in pets recently as well, specifically dogs, according to Shelter Manager Isha Buis.

“I think some of it has to do with the new year and the fireworks, loud things and booms that everybody thinks are fun, but the animals don’t,” Buis said.

She said that the Northwest SPCA is at max capacity, but that it is seeing decent adoption numbers. Buis said that the Northwest SPCA animal shelter has been working with other shelters and rescue groups to help dogs get adopted.

The Butte County Animal Control is experiencing an increase of calls related to stray dogs, according to the Animal Control Program Manager Ryan Soulsby.

“We do unfortunately see a rise in stray dogs on New Year’s Day as well as the day after Fourth of July,” he said. “And that’s mostly because they’re scared of the fireworks.”

Soulsby said that animal control also received a an increase of calls about injured stray dogs the day after New Year’s Eve.

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